City Landscape

Gardens in a Rented Property – Common Tenant Questions

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Gardens in a rented property can be a thorny issue. Garden maintenance takes time and effort, but what are your responsibilities as a tenant?

If, as a tenant, you are a keen gardener, then that’s great, but what happens when there is no time or energy for you to maintain an outside space? Even if you love to garden, you can find it can drop further and further down the to-do list.

 

To help tenants, we’ve gathered together answers to the questions we are often asked about gardens in a rented property.

 

Questions we are often asked by our tenants about gardens in a rented property

 

Q: What exactly is the tenant’s responsibility when it comes to the garden?

A: The general rule of thumb and a standard clause in tenancy agreements, is that tenants are expected to keep their garden litter-free, reasonably tidy and not overgrown.

 

As a tenant, you are ultimately responsible for ensuring the gardens in your rented property stays in the same state at the end of a tenancy, as it was in the beginning. This includes jobs such as mowing the lawn and keeping hedges trimmed. To aid both parties, it’s a good idea to ensure there are (dated) photos taken at the beginning of a tenancy agreement. Landlords can’t expect a tenant to turn a mess of a garden into a palatial retreat!

 

There are 3 main points to remember

  • Return the garden to the same state it was when the tenancy began
  • Keep the garden reasonably tidy, not overgrown and litter-free
  • You as a tenant are responsible for your behaviour and actions (and those of your guests) in the garden

 

Q: Can I change anything about the garden?

A: Generally most landlords are ok with this, provided it’s an improvement. However, should you wish to change the garden in any way,  you MUST get the landlords approval. This even applies to planting some new flowers. The odd plant or 2 may not seem like much but there might be a valid reason why certain plants wouldn’t work for the property. Failing to seek the landlord’s permission could result in a charge to the tenant to return the garden to the way it was.

 

Q: Am I ok to have a party in the garden?

A: Tenants can have social events in their garden such as summer parties. You are responsible though for everything that then goes with that. This makes you responsible for noise, nuisance or damage caused, together with tidying up any mess. If a landlord wanted to restrict any activities, it would need to be explicitly written into the tenancy agreement.

 

Q: Does the landlord have to provide gardening equipment for general garden maintenance?

A: There is no obligation for a landlord to provide garden maintenance equipment. The reason being, it can lead to additional risks for both landlord and tenant.

 

 

For more advice on this topic or any other questions on rented accommodation, don’t hesitate to contact us on 01603 763363. For other ways to contact us >>

Gardens in a Rented Property – Common Tenant Questions

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